Creating the conditions for Business Agility

Hugh Ivory Business transformation Leave a Comment

Organisations need to constantly adapt in order to succeed. At Agilesphere, we believe that (top down) organisations need to understand their customers evolving needs, and invest in the development and delivery of products and services that best meet those needs. We also believe that (bottom-up) delivery teams using user-centred Agile approaches are best placed to understand users needs and to …

Agilesphere Founders: Jeremy Renwick, Davina Sirisena, Hugh Ivory

Claiming the CxO title for agile leadership

Davina Sirisena Blog

Leading Agilesphere Over the last few years, Hugh, Jeremy and I have each brought our complementary leadership strengths to Agilesphere. It’s the combination that has made Agilesphere the success it is today. We work well together, we lean on each other, and our relationship is an equal one in terms of skills, experience and effort. None of us could have …

Scaling agile: What can I do before adding more people / cost?

Jeremy Renwick Agile at scale, Blog

When scaling agile, it’s important to keep front of mind that we are spending other people’s money. We should always think about delivering value for money from outset and be transparent with ourselves and stakeholders about Value. A sponsor will ask the questions “Are we getting value for money?” and/or “Can’t we go faster?”. These are legitimate challenges and as …

Crossing the chasm and beyond

Jeremy Renwick Business transformation, White paper

The technology adoption lifecycle (Chasm theory) summarises how communities respond to discontinuous innovation, i.e. new products that require the end user and the marketplace to dramatically change their past behaviour to achieve the promise of equally dramatic new benefits. Past examples of this are fax machines, personal computers, spreadsheets and electronic mail. The original work from as early as the 1950s …

Agile – What’s in it for me?

Jeremy Renwick Agile coaching, White paper

Agile has proved its worth in many organisations by improving the delivery and quality of software projects. This is particularly true of the use of agile to deliver new “digital” services that harness the power, cost efficiencies and reach of the web to disrupt existing business models or create new industries. There is, however, a big difference between implementing agile …

Agile: Stuck in the IT Ghetto? 

Jeremy Renwick Blog

I’ve rarely had a problem with getting business engagement in my deliveries, in fact it’s usually the opposite – too many different voices!  So if other very good Agilists had a problem is there something else going on? Having started looking, I saw more and more of it, some patterns formed and I have come to the conclusion that in general Agile is stuck in the IT Ghetto and is finding …

Digital by default: knowledge and experience

Davina Sirisena Blog, Digital delivery

This is one of our ‘ways of working’ blog posts focused on what we offer and how we work with our clients. If you’re building a digital service in government, it’s important that you operate within Government Digital Service (GDS) guidelines specifically referencing the Service Design Manual and adhering to the Digital by Default Service Standard, including passing the related assessments at the end …

Agile delivery: focusing on outcomes

Davina Sirisena Blog, Business transformation

Collaborative working, when facilitated by an experienced delivery manager, keeps the whole team focused on an agile delivery. Agilesphere delivery managers keep people focused on delivery by involving everyone in creating and updating plans and prioritised backlogs. Working together, and then keeping everything as visible as possible, helps ensure that the whole team stays completely focused on delivery. Regular retrospectives are …

Setting an analysis rhythm in large or complex programmes

Davina Sirisena Blog, Digital delivery

Back in January, Davina wrote a series of blog posts about setting an analysis rhythm in large or complex programmes for the Government Digital Service (GDS). There are four parts: Part 1: Setting an analysis rhythm in large or complex programmes Part 2: High level design Part 3: Detailed design Part 4: Support build, test and iteration Below is a taster …